The Rayograph

Peter Lipton’s Photographs Show Us Some of Ecuador’s Most Endangered Amphibians

Through a recent series, Amsterdam-based photographer Peter Lipton spotlights an important research and conservation project called “Balsa de los sapos,” or “Life raft of the frogs.” The project, run by the Catholic University in Quito, aims to collect, reproduce, and return a variety of Ecuador’s endangered frogs to their native habitat. Lipton’s photographs beautifully showcase each specimen’s uniqueness, while highlighting the fact that almost nine percent of the world’s amphibian species are found in Ecuador, a third of which are in danger of becoming extinct forever.

Hyalinobatrachium –
Peter Lipton - Hyalinobatrachium

Hyloscirtus larinopygion, one of three specimens known –
Peter Lipton - Hyloscirtus larinopygion

Atelopus SP, one of three specimens known, all of which are female –
Peter Lipton - Atelopus SP

Centrolenidae SP –
Peter Lipton - Centrolenidae SP

Hyloscirtus SP, last known specimen –
Peter Lipton - Hyloscirtus SP

Espadarana callistomma –
Peter Lipton - Espadarana Callistomma

Gastrotheca espeletia, last known specimen –
Peter Lipton - Gastrotheca Espeletia

Via Feature Shoot.

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This entry was published on May 3, 2013 at 8:15 PM. It’s filed under Uncategorized and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

3 thoughts on “Peter Lipton’s Photographs Show Us Some of Ecuador’s Most Endangered Amphibians

  1. I have loved so many things that you have posted on The Rayograph. Each posting has enriched my life and expanded my perspective. This, is my favorite, thus far.

  2. Wonderful work.
    Our amphibians in Florida are not faring much better.
    You should come and see them while they are still here~

  3. This is such a beautiful but horribly sad set of pictures!! I just saved a little frog from dehydration in my kitchen this morning (for some reason they keep crawling behind my fridge and dying there) but I don’t think he was an endangered little dude…

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